NELMS NEWS Node 2017

An annotated list of current events & issues related to the middle level
(updated 3/20/17)

Be sure to check back each week for a new article of interest.
This week's featured article is:

'Wonder' project helps Highland sixth-graders learn value of kindness
http://www.heraldbulletin.com/community/wonder-project-helps-highland-sixth-graders-learn…

Highland Middle School sixth-graders Bekah Bale, 11, and Robby James, 12, decorated brown paper bags with colored markers then filled them with a pencil, candy and eraser or pencil sharpener as about 25 of their classmates did the same.
The project in in Mary Ann Wildman’s high ability language arts class was in preparation for a random act of kindness when the students each select a schoolmate to whom to give the bag.
“If you are having a bad day, even the smallest thing can cheer you up,” Robby said.

The (Anderson, IN) Herald Bulletin 3/12/17


How do you teach kids to care about something? Here’s how one teacher does it.
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/answer-sheet/wp/2017/03/03/how-do-you-teach-kids-to-care…

Much of the media attention in education today is being given to President Trump, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos and their plans for education. Here, for a change, is a post about something completely different, taking us back into a classroom and what students and teachers are doing.
How do you teach children to do good — and to really learn something authentic from the experience?
Carol Gannon, a fifth-grade general studies teacher at Hebrew Day School of Ann Arbor, Mich., has been doing it for years. She’s employed project-based learning with a service component for nearly two decades, working to inspire her students to reach out to those in need.

The Washington Post 3/3/17

 

Do we all have some grading bias?
http://smartbrief.com/original/2017/02/do-we-all-have-some-grading-bias?utm_source=brief

Gulp, someone said it. As much as we take for granted that students are graded solely on their work alone, we know in our hearts that our personal biases towards each student can play a factor in how we assess them. If you’re an automaton who’s unaffected by your students’ behaviors and thus immune from human emotional trappings, please feel free to stop reading.

Smart Brief 2/13/17

 

Debate: How Can Students Become Prepared to Spot Fake News?
https://listenwise.com/current_events/830-debate-how-can-students-become-prepared-to-spot-fake-news

A recent study tested over 7,800 teenagers on their ability to differentiate fake from real news and sponsored ads from news articles. The results showed that 80-90 percent of high school students had a difficult time judging the credibility of news. This skill is necessary to make choices about what to believe and what to share. Listen to this story to hear more about this study and what can be done to educate people about fake news and then debate with your students, how can students become prepared to spot fake news?

ListenWise1/27/17

 

Elementary school students create dual-language newspaper
https://www.goskagit.com/news/elementary-school-students-create-bilingual-newspaper/

What started out as West View Elementary School classmates drawing comic strips has evolved into something more — the school’s own monthly newspaper, with a twist.
Because West View is a dual-language school, the newspaper — the Bobcat Gazette — is printed in both English and Spanish.
“So people who are learning English could read the Spanish side,” said Iliana Lopez, one of the sixth-graders behind the paper’s founding. “I like sharing stories with people and I thought it would be even cooler to share with the school.”

GoSkagit1/26/17

Video chats boost connection, learning
http://www.mcphersonsentinel.com/news/20170106/video-chats-boost-connection-learning

Teachers are checking Twitter, Facebook, Instagram and Skype in the middle of class - not to goof off, but to connect students to learning opportunities across the nation.
Video chat services are gaining popularity in classrooms for a number of reasons, partly because it's free, but primarily because students cement in concepts quickly through experiences.
"The more voices I can bring to our experience in the classroom, the better quality of ideas we'll have," said Paul Carver, fifth-grade teacher at Eisenhower Elementary School in McPherson. "We can be so much more global and so much more aware of what's past the surface level understanding of a thing. We can actually experience it through talking to these other people."

McPherson Sentinel 1/6/17

 

For teachers, it's not just what you say, it's how you say it
https://edsource.org/2017/for-teachers-its-not-just-what-you-say-its-how-you-say-it/574363

Denisia Wash, a kindergarten teacher in Berkeley, didn’t want to use a sugary voice when she talked to her 5-year-old students – they weren’t babies and that voice wasn’t actually effective, she said. But she didn’t want to use a sharp-edged voice either, the impatient tone that can come out when she’s tired or under pressure. “I call that teacher voice my ‘stress voice,’” she said.

Last year, she conducted an experiment as part of her evaluation at Berkeley Unified. If she changed her tone of voice, would her students feel more involved in what they were learning?

Ed Source 1/4/17


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